How a high-fibre diet can improve your oral health

How a high-fibre diet can improve your oral health

A new study* conducted by New Zealand researchers at the University of Otago aims to figure out why high fibre foods are good for your oral health. Previous clinical research has already established that a higher fibre and wholegrain intake is beneficial for oral health, but the Kiwi scientists now want to better understand the actual mechanism that makes it so.

How do high fibre foods benefit your oral health?

Although the links between a high fibre diet and better oral health have been recognised by a number of studies, the reasons why still need more confirmation. However, scientists have identified a few potentially beneficial mechanisms that occur when you consume foods high in fibre:

  1. Cleansing action. The fibre in high fibre foods may gently scrap and buff your tooth surfaces, removing plaque build-up in the process.
  2. Oral bacterial inhibition. Certain substances found in the bran layer of wholegrains may inhibit the growth of oral bacteria.
  3. Chewing increases saliva production. Consuming high fibre foods involves a lot of healthy chewing. This increases your mouth’s production of cleansing, anti-bacterial saliva, as well as stimulating blood flow to your teeth & gums.

What are the best high-fibre foods?

High-fibre foods refer to foods that are high in dietary fibre. To get the fibre you need, there are a number of foods that are rich in fibre, including:

  • Vegetables – Vegetables that are rich in fibre are generally richer or darker in colour but there are exceptions. High fibre veges include carrots, celery, broccoli, beetroot, leafy greens (incl. spinach, silver beet, pak choi & kale) and potatoes (incl. sweet potato).
  • Fruit – High fibre fruits include apples, oranges, pears, bananas and berries.
  • Wholegrains – Wholegrain foods that are high in fibre include intact wholegrains and finely milled wholegrains such as whole grain breads (dark rye, pumpernickel & whole wheat), oats, brown rice, wild rice, bran and barley. Choose bread with at least 3 grams of fibre per slice.
  • Beans and legumes – Try adding more lentils, peas and beans to your casseroles, soups and salads.
  • Seeds & Nuts – Watch the calories but try loading up on chia seeds, quinoa, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, pistachios and almonds.

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How much fibre should you eat per day?

The Heart Foundation’s recommended intake of fibre per day is 30 grams for men and 25 grams for women. Children aged between 4 and 8 years old should consume at least 18 grams. Girls aged between 9 and 18 years old should increase their intake gradually from 20 to 22 grams, while boys need to consume 24 to 28 grams. But it’s totally ok to eat more than these recommended amounts!

To simplify, this recommended fibre intake translates into:

  • approx. 4 serves of wholegrain or wholemeal foods daily,
  • approx. 5 serves of vegetables, beans or legumes daily, and
  • approx. 2 serves of fruit daily.

Reference:

* Dental Tribune International. (2019, January 24). Researchers investigate link between high fibre diets and oral health. Retrieved from https://ap.dental-tribune.com/news/researchers-investigate-link-between-high-fibre-diets-and-oral-health/